Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium

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COS Secretariat
Cambridge Conferences
The Lawn
33 Church Street
Great Shelford
Cambridge, CB22 5EL

Tel: +44 (0)1223 847464
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Facilitated by Cambridge Eye Trust

45th Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium

Fisher Building, St John's College, Cambridge, UK,  2nd - 4th September 2015
Topic: Light
Chairmen: Professor John Marshall
Academic Organiser: Martin Snead

We are delighted to invite you to come to Cambridge to the forty-fifth Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium. Apart from the excellent scientific programme, you will have the opportunity to discover and enjoy some of the best known Colleges in one of the world's most famous universities. Cambridge abounds with buildings of great historical and architectural interest, and is rich in important museums and culture.

The Cambridge Ophthalmological Symposium is unique among ophthalmological gatherings. It is a two day residential meeting which brings together basic scientists and clinicians to discuss a well defined topic in detail under the chairmanship of one of the leaders in that field.

The conference will be centred in the Fisher Building, St John's college and you will find it hard to avoid the feeling of sharing its history. St John's College was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort, (mother of Henry VII) whose descendants formed the Tudor dynasty. Its fine sixteenth and seventeenth century courts are linked to the later nineteenth century Gothic "New Court" by the picturesque Bridge of Sighs, and within the College can also be found the oldest surviving secular building in Cambridge, The School of Pythagoras, dating from about 1200. It was the St John's College Boat Club which first challenged Oxford to a race, so originating the annual University Boat Race on the Thames.

We much look forward to seeing you in Cambridge in 2014. We can assure you of a warm welcome and we hope you will take away not only some new ideas about this challenging field of medicine, but also a lasting memory of Cambridge.